About this blog

This blog is about the daily activities in a busy typewriter shop. I want to share with you the many interesting people who come in here, the beautiful machines I get and most of all the great typewriter stories that people share with me!

Thursday, November 19, 2015

The Typewriter Rodeo Comes To Town

The Typewriter Rodeo at work.

This 1922 Corona 3 will look great on film.

This picture doesn't do this ingenious  innovation justice.

A wonderful little book store in a small town near me.

This is an art exhibit at The Hess Collection in Napa, California

This 1953 Oliver Portable is a beautiful machine.


  1. You've had quite a lot going on. The poster in the book store is wonderful. I may adapt it to a typewriter.

  2. That Oliver is the sweetest thing. And I must go find that bookstore!

  3. Lots of good stuff in this post. That's a great poem by Sean! The Typewriter Rodeo poets are also pictured in my book, as you may have noticed. Nice to see the book stacked up there, by the way—next to one by typist Susanna Kaysen.

    That modification of the ribbon cartridge really is clever.

    I will be in Boston in March and hope to see you then; I'll keep you posted.

    Happy Thanksgiving to you and your family!

  4. Bill M. - Thanks for your nice comments. That Book store flier is pretty cool.
    Janet- Thanks! Can't remember if I showed you the Oliver Portable when you were in. It's a really neat machine, I should have types on it for the blog.
    Richard P- Thanks for the great comments! Your books are selling in the shop. Susanna Kaysen has been a customer for over thirty years. Very nice person and funny when she comes in. All the best to you and your family over the holidays!

  5. I cannot imagine how that modification works, will the ribbon go both ways? That whole left side had to have been built from scratch or introduced from another machine... some form of this mod would be pretty marketable I would think. Is it easier though than spooling a new ribbon into an old cartridge (something I have not yet tried)?

  6. I have two SC electrics that look very similar on the outside. One has a regular spool ribbon, the other that $#!!#% cartridge.

    The cartridge machine dates probably from the early 70's. The spool machine from the early 80's -- probably one of the last of this style machine SC made, I would think.

    Regardless, I wonder, since the machines are so mechanically similar how hard this would be to do... I'll need to so some investigation when I get home!